An Antibody That Can Accurately Find Your T Cells

Being diagnosed with an immunodeficiency can be devastating. It can completely change the way you live your life on a daily basis. From the foods you eat to the way you spend your free time, an immunodeficiency has a large impact. However, being sure that this is in fact what you’re suffering from is extremely important as well. There are many illnesses that can have remarkably similar symptoms to an immunodeficiency, and getting your diagnosis confused can slow your progress towards getting the treatment you need. When testing for an immunodeficiency, many scientists use will use a FOXP3 antibody to locate and mark CD4 T cells. The levels of these cells are commonly referred to when determining an HIV or AIDS diagnosis. By using a genetically engineered antibody to locate the CD4 T cells, a doctor can more accurately diagnose you and ensure that you get the right treatment as soon as possible.

Low T and High T

It’s rather well known that diminishing CD4 T cell counts indicate HIV, and as such if your CD4 count drops past a certain point your doctor will recommend that you seek treatment for HIV. However, it’s not so clear what a high T count could mean. This can also be discovered with the FOXP3 antibody and, unlike a diminishing CD4 count, it doesn’t always mean one thing. High T cells can be a result of many different illnesses from mononucleosis to certain types of leukemia. Regardless of the severity, this immunodeficiency also needs to be investigated as it could result in big problems later down the road. When you go to a doctor with certain symptoms, they will run their own tests to see what you have, but they won’t always do a blood test. Because of the massive number of things that can be revealed by a blood test using antibodies and proteins such as FOXP3, it’s always a good idea to urge your doctor for a blood test when you’re feeling overly concerned about a particular issue.

To learn more about the FOXP3 antibody, contact Spring Bioscience online at http://www.springbio.com/.

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