How a Collaborative Divorce Makes Financial Sense

Divorces have been a choice for the last few decades, yet have taken off within the past few years. Or at least they have taken off within the media; some statistics imply the amount of couples going the collaborative divorce path is fairly low. For example, from 2010 – 2012, Waukesha County had 3,862 divorces within that period, there were just 62 collaborative cases filed, according to the Wisconsin Law Journal.

Collaborative divorce isn’t for everyone
However, a collaborative divorce is not for everyone. To begin with, it is critical that you be aware of the nuances. Within collaborative divorces, all parties have their own attorney – just like a traditional divorce. The concept is that the attorneys and their clients are going to work and meet with each other to reach a harmonious agreement.

Then there is divorce mediation, where the soon-to-be divorced couple will have one professional, oftentimes a mediation service or mediator, work with them to amicably end the marriage. Divorce through mediation will resemble a collaborative divorce, yet you should know the differences ahead of time, in order for you to know which route you should take.

Big draws of collaborative divorce
One of the main draws of collaborative divorces are that they may save individuals money. Reliable numbers on the price of an average divorce are difficult to attain; however, the general consensus is that the average divorce is priced from $15,000 to $30,000. However, if you choose the mediation path the average cost is around $7,500.

The reason that collaborative divorce may save the couple money is that less lawyers are involved. A collaborative divorce may include an interdisciplinary staff that may comprise of divorce coaches – therapists who are trained with the collaborative model – child specialists and financial neutrals, if applicable.

For more information contact Michael C. Craven, Divorce Lawyers at +1 312-621-5234.

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